2018 Traffic Calming Pilot Projects | City of St. John's

2018 Traffic Calming Pilot Projects

2018 Traffic Calming Pilot Projects

The following six projects were discussed at Committee of the Whole February 14, 2018 and announced by Council on the same day. More information on engagement opportunities will be posted at engagestjohns.ca.

1) Rawlins Cross (Monkstown Road, Rennie’s Mill Road, Prescott Street, Gower Street, Flavin Street, King’s Road, and Military Road) – Unsignalized Traffic Circulation
Implementation Rating: Complex
By removing the two traffic signals and introducing unsignalized circulatory control this pilot project would look to determine if capacity, level of service, and safety in this area can be improved. Figure 1 illustrates the proposed pilot implementation plan. Please note that accommodation has been made for emergency services so that they are not negatively impacted by this change.

Figure 1: Rawlins Cross – Unsignalized Traffic Circulation

2) Freshwater Road at Pennywell Road, Cookstown Road, and Field Street – Guide Islands
Implementation Rating: Moderate
This project would simplify the existing stop controlled intersection of Freshwater Road, Pennywell Road, Cookstown Road, and Field Street by introducing a series of guide islands as illustrated in Figure 2. This pilot would test a potential improvement to traffic circulation at the intersection that is intended to reduce driver confusion. Please note that the large center island would be of a roll-over design to accommodate Metrobus through this intersection.

Figure 2: Freshwater Road at Pennywell Road, Cookstown Road, and Field Street – Roundabout

3) Military Road at Bannerman Park – Curb Extensions and Crosswalk
Implementation Rating: Simple
Using temporary traffic control islands to create curb extensions along Military Road would decrease pedestrian crossing distance to improve pedestrian safety and visibility at the existing crosswalk. This pilot would test the impacts and functionality of a narrowed roadway crosssection at this location. Figure 3 illustrates the proposed pilot implementation plan.

Figure 3: Military Road at Bannerman Park – Curb Extensions and Crosswalk

4) Ladysmith Drive and Kiwanis Street – Curb Extensions and Crosswalk
Implementation Rating: Simple
In response to community requests for a crosswalk along Ladysmith Drive, this pilot would trial a crosswalk enhanced with curb extensions created using traffic control islands to determine the potential demand for a marked crossing at this location. Figure 4 illustrates the proposed pilot implementation plan. Past syudies have indicated that a crosswalk is not warranted but feedback from the community has indicated that it would be used if available. This project would test this “if you build it they will come” premise.

Figure 4: Ladysmith Drive and Kiwanis Street – Curb Extensions and Crosswalk

5) Terra Nova Road and Wishingwell Road – Curb Extensions
Implementation Rating: Simple
In order to improve intersection sight lines, curb extensions using traffic control islands would be developed along Terra Nova Road at Wishingwell Road as shown in Figure 5. This project would not only test the sight line impacts of this improvement but would also be used to trial winter operations and permanency of new traffic control islands. Unlike the other identified 2018 pilot projects, this treatment would remain in place for the fall and winter of 2018/2019. In the spring of 2019 the results of project and the condition of the traffic control island would be reviewed and a decision would be made as to if the installation should remain as a permanent feature or if it should be removed.

Figure 5: Terra Nova Road and Wishingwell Road – Curb Extensions

6) Tree Top Drive – Neighbourhood Street Art Painting
Implementation Rating: Simple
In response to community concerns regarding speeding and road safety along Tree Top Drive the City would engage with the surrounding neighbourhood to coordinate a community lead street art event this summer. The intention of the project is to provide a visual traffic calming effect. Members of the community would be invited to submit their artistic design to be painted along sections of the roadway shown in Figure 6. In the interest of safety, the design must not include any words, resemble any form of traffic control devices or markings, or include any interactive games (eg. hopscotch) that would encourage children to play on the roadway. The City would review the submitted design to ensure that it meets these criteria. The community would supply the paint and materials needed for the project and the City would coordinate with the community and supply traffic control services on a Sunday to allow residents to safely paint their design.

Figure 6: Tree Top Drive Neighbourhood Street Art Painting